Feel like being a sitting duck in front of the error message of Kernel Mode Heap Corruption? If you find yourself in a bind due to this BSOD (Blue Screen of Death) issue, don’t panic – surely you’re not alone. Here we’ve gathered up a few solutions that prove to be useful to many Windows users. Before you reach out to a technician, why not try the following methods and fix the problem by yourself? If ever succeed, you’ll save up a sum of money – anyway, a penny saved is a penny earned!

What is Kernel Mode Heap Corruption?

Kernel Mode Heap Corruption is one of the stop codes presented by Windows when you run into BSOD. As is the case with other codes, Kernel Mode Heap Corruption is created uniquely, which aims at helping users address their specific problems that trigger system crashes. However, it’s not that easy to nail down the root causes, so in most cases we can only take a shot in the dark. Luckily, there’s still a trace of clue allowing us to troubleshoot the problem – that is, the Kernel Mode Heap Corruption error is in large part related to driver issues (especially graphics card drivers) or software conflicts. Since the possibility of hardware malfunctions cannot be completely ruled out, you may as well need to do some checking on your computer, such as the Windows memory diagnostic test.

Besides, you may encounter the Kernel Mode Heap Corruption error in different ways. Some said they bumped into BSOD during login, while others were obsessed by this error when launching specific programs such as a video game. Whatever issue it is that you’re facing, take your time to check out the methods in this post and see whether they serve their purposes well.

How to solve the Kernel Mode Heap Corruption error?

Here we provide you with 6 fixes that have helped many people solve their problems. You don’t need to try them all; just work your way down the list until you find the one that works for you.

If you can’t reboot your computer normally after BSOD occurs (say, BSOD runs in a loop during the boot process), you should first enter safe mode and then try out the fixes below.
For more details about how to boot into safe mode, please refer to this post at
https://www.drivereasy.com/knowledge/how-to-enter-safe-mode-in-windows-10/

Fix 1: Roll back your graphics card drivers

Fix 2: Update your device drivers

Fix 3: Repair corrupted system files

Fix 4: Check for software conflicts

Fix 5: Check for hardware issues

Fix 6: Reinstall your Windows system


Fix 1: Roll back your graphics card drivers

Some Windows users reported that they ran into BSOD right after an update of their graphics card drivers (or a Windows update). If that’s the case, you’re suggested to restore your video driver to a previous version to secure the stability of your hardware device. Here’s how to do it:

1) On your keyboard, press the Windows Logo Key and R at the same time to invoke the Run dialog box. Then type devmgmt.msc into the box and click OK.

2) Here pops up Device Manager. Double-click on the Display adapters node to expand its drop-down list.

3) Right-click on your current video card and select Properties from the context menu.

4) Go to the Driver tab and select Roll Back Driver.

If the Roll Back Driver option is grayed out, that means there’s no driver to roll back to. In this case you’ll have to try other fixes.

5) Choose one of the reasons based on your own conditions and click Yes.

6) Don’t forget to restart your computer for the changes to take effect even if you’re not asked to.

After you restore your video driver to a previous version, verify if the BSOD problem still persists. Hopefully it doesn’t; otherwise you may proceed to the next fix, below.


Fix 2: Update your device drivers

An outdated or corrupt driver may impose risks to your hardware and even trigger certain crashes, such as the Kernel Mode Heap Corruption error. If you’re not sure whether all your device drivers (especially graphics card drivers) are up-to-date, you can have a try at updating those drivers.

If you don’t have the time, patience or computer skills to update your device drivers manually, you can do it automatically with Driver Easy.

Driver Easy will automatically recognize your system and find the correct drivers for it. You don’t need to know exactly what system your computer is running, you don’t need to risk downloading and installing the wrong driver, and you don’t need to worry about making a mistake when installing. Driver Easy takes care of everything.

You can update your drivers automatically with either the FREE or the Pro version of Driver Easy. But with the Pro version it takes just 2 clicks:

1) Download and install Driver Easy.

2) Run Driver Easy and click the Scan Now button. Driver Easy will then scan your computer and detect any problem drivers. 

3) Click the Update button next to a flagged driver to automatically download the correct version of that driver, then you can manually install it (you can do this with the FREE version).

Or click Update All to automatically download and install the correct version of all the drivers that are missing or out of date on your system. (This requires the Pro version which comes with full support and a 30-day money back guarantee. You’ll be prompted to upgrade when you click Update All.)

If you have any problems using Driver Easy to update your driver, please feel free to email us at support@drivereasy.com. We are always here if we can help.

Fix 3: Repair corrupted system files

It’s possible that some of the system files in your computer are corrupted, hence the reason for your BSOD error. To repair them, there are two things you should do:

Run System File Checker

System file checker (sfc) is a Windows utility that checks for system file corruption. You may use the command sfc /scannow to scan all protected system files and repair the missing or corrupted ones.

1) On your keyboard, press the Windows Logo Key and R at the same time to open the Run dialog box. Type cmd and press Ctrl+Shift+Enter to run Command Prompt as administrator.

2) When prompted with permission to make changes to your device, click Yes.

3) In the pop-up window of Command Prompt, type the following command (note that there’s a space between sfc and /):

sfc /scannow

After you finish entering the command, hit Enter on your keyboard. Then the sfc tool will begin to scan all system files and repair the corrupted or missing ones.

4) Wait until the verification process completes.

Run dism.exe

DISM (Deployment Image Servicing and Management) is a command-line tool used for different purposes, which scan a gamut from managing the data included in the Windows image to servicing the image itself. Here you’ll simply use dism.exe to check for image corruption and correct the issues if there’s any.

1) On your keyboard, press the Windows Logo Key and R at the same time to open the Run dialog box. Type cmd and press Ctrl+Shift+Enter to run Command Prompt as administrator.

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If prompted for consent, click Yes.

2) In Command Prompt, type the following command (note that there’s a space to the left of each slash “/”):

dism.exe /online /cleanup-image /restorehealth 

After that, hit Enter on your keyboard. Then the DISM tool will begin to scan for any problems and try to fix them.

Wait for the process to complete. Then, reboot your computer and see whether the Kernel Mode Heap Corruption error still lingers on. If so, you may move on to the next fix.


Fix 4: Check for software conflicts

Another possible culprit for your Kernel Mode Heap Corruption error is the software conflicts. Did you get plagued by the blue screen error since the installation of a new app? Or does this issue occur only when you’re trying to launch a certain program, such as a video game? If either of the answers is “yes,” then you should pay more attention to the checking for software clashes.

There’s no shortcut for you to pinpoint the exact conflicting applications. You’d better shut down every unnecessary program running in the background and check to see whether BSOD still pops up at certain moments. If not, then some of these programs should be blamed for causing you the trouble. Once you find out the culprits, simply disable them when running other programs, or uninstall them if possible.

But what if you don’t want to disable or remove the program that conflicts with others? A workaround is that you can set its priority to low via Task Manager (it doesn’t necessarily resolve your BSOD issue). Here’s how to do it:

1) On your keyboard, press the Windows Logo key and R at the same time to invoke the Run dialog box. Type in taskmgr and hit Enter.

2) Go to the Details tab. Scroll through the list until you locate the process for which you want to change the priority. Right-click on that item and select Set priority > Low.

Do not change the priorities for any programs that you’re not familiar with. If you mistakenly set the priority of a crucial system process to low, it may lead to system crashes, freezing or other critical problems.
It doesn’t have to be chrome.exe. This screenshot is just an example for better explanation.

3) Click Change priority if prompted for permission.

Now go on to check whether the BSOD issue recurs when you launch one or more certain programs. If so, there’re still two more fixes you can try.


Fix 5: Check for hardware issues

After taking so many measures to troubleshoot software issues, you should now turn your eyes upon the hardware equipment and see if there’s anything wrong with it. Here’s the things you are supposed to do:

Run Windows Memory Diagnostic Tool

Check to see if there’s a problem with your RAM (Random Access Memory):

1) On your keyboard, press the Windows logo key and R at the same time to invoke the Run dialog box. Type mdsched.exe and hit Enter.

2) Select either Restart now and check for problems (recommended) to check your memory straight away, or Check for problems the next time I start my computer if you want to keep working and do the memory check later.

Remember to save your work before clicking Restart now and check for problems (recommended). It will reboot your computer instantly.

3) When the Windows Memory Diagnostic Tool actually runs, you’ll see the following screen that indicates the number of passes it’s doing, along with how far it has progressed.

If you don’t see any errors here, that means the memory in your computer is fine. Otherwise you should replace your RAM or simply reach out to the hardware manufacturer for help.

Check for other issues such as overheating

It’s not that easy to tinker with the hardware if you’re a computer newbie. You need to disassemble the computer chassis, look for problems in each separate component, and find ways to fix them – all by yourself. Merely thinking of it is horrible enough, not to mention putting it into practice. Anyway, if you don’t have much interest in learning the skills, you should contact a local technician for further help.

Once you find out there’s nothing wrong with your hardware, you still have one more fix to try – reinstall the Windows system.


Fix 6: Reinstall your Windows system

If by any chance the fixes above don’t work for you, you may reset or reinstall your Windows operating system as a last resort. You can choose to either reset your PC, or reinstall the entire Windows system.

Listed below are some useful articles that teach you to how to reset or reinstall Windows 10 step by step:

To view more details about how to reinstall/clean install Windows 10, you may take a look at this post from Microsoft Support.


By now, have you succeeded in solving your Kernel Mode Heap Corruption error? If you have any follow-up questions or ideas, please feel free to leave a comment below. We’ll be more than glad to help you in any ways. Thanks for reading, and good luck to you all!

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